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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The E and S63 were called that because they originally had the M156 6.2L V8 which was the first AMG designed engine. The reason it was called a 6.3 is to pay homage to the M100, Mercedes' first V8. I assume when they come up with a brand new E and S they may change the numbering.

The other CLA numbers are reasonably related to displacement or something else (45 to AMG's anniversary), but the 250 I can't place anywhere.
 

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The E and S63 were called that because they originally had the M156 6.2L V8 which was the first AMG designed engine. The reason it was called a 6.3 is to pay homage to the M100, Mercedes' first V8. I assume when they come up with a brand new E and S they may change the numbering.

The other CLA numbers are reasonably related to displacement or something else (45 to AMG's anniversary), but the 250 I can't place anywhere.
I was going to say that 250 is similar to the torque on the 250 (258lb), but that would be a bad guess.

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ah, that may be so. That's the closer than anything else. Wonder why they picked that other than to find a bigger rounded number. Then again, they just kind of make up things along the way. At least it's better than some of the made up names for cars.
 

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Picturing an engineer saying... "Let's call this car the 258!"

Then someone in marketing reads it with fuzzy glasses as 250... and the name was born.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Picturing an engineer saying... "Let's call this car the 258!"

Then someone in marketing reads it with fuzzy glasses as 250... and the name was born.
So by that logic the marketing guy who came up with the Dodge Dart Swinger was wearing beer goggles and the Subaru Brat must've had a big fight with his teenage son. And the Ferrari LaFerrari and Renault LeCar guy must've been bored. Thank god Mercedes Jellinek wasn't named Bertha. Otherwise we'd all be drooling over the Bertha CLA. Imagine a Bertha with Kompressor on it. :D
 

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In the not so distant past, Mercedes (and BMW) used the engine's liter displacement in the name, i.e., 300D had a 3.0 liter diesel, the 450SEL had a 4.5 liter. In rare cases such as in the 6.9 Mercedes used this on designation on the right side of the trunk versus the traditional left. In the case of the 6.9 the left had a 450SEL designation and the right at the 6.9 label. As Mercedes started using turbocharging they started using the associated label to represent what the equivalent liter displacement would be.

The 250 designation probably means that the horsepower output (if normally aspirated) would be that of a 2.5 liter. It appears only the normally aspirated cars (E350, GLK350) are the only ones with "truth" in their names. There are other exceptions like the S500 which remains in markets outside the U.S. where there is equity in that designation versus the U.S.'s S550 (which is really a 4.6 liter engine).
 

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Here's a bit of a stretch.... 2 for the engine displacement and the 5 for the number of people it accommodates. A zero is added to keep the 3 digit style of non AMG badging.
 

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I see it as being 2 as in 2 liter and the 50 meaning it has a turbo. Like BMW does. You have a 330i, then you have a 335i with the 5 designating turbo.
But the C250 is a 1.8 liter.
 

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The mystery continues.
 

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I've read that since 1993 when Mercedes started their new naming, the letters designate the model, the numbers are a relative trim level. So a C250 and CLA250 are similar in features and trim but are different cars. A C300 would have better standard features then a C250 or a CLA250. You will see some of the more prestigious models don't have low trim levels. S550 and CL600 for example.
 
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